Boycott and Divest

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Protect Water: #NestlePledge and #StarbucksPledge

Pledge to #BoycottNestle and #BoycottStarbucks, then access and share our list of better brands.

Undoing the Damage

Honor your values with your wallet: Boycott and divest from companies hurting Unci Maka. Nestle, the world’s largest food and beverage company, has a long history of water theft, damaging precious ecosystems, and dangerous marketing practices. Now, coffee conglomerate Starbucks has struck a multibillion dollar deal with Nestle. We ask you to take the #NestlePledge and #BoycottNestle, #BoycottStarbucks, and their families of brands. You can also send a strong message by removing your money from the 35 major banks responsible for the construction of pipelines without the free, prior, and informed consent of the Lakota people.

LPLP Creates List of Alternative Products

Boycotting the biggest names in food and coffee can be difficult without viable alternatives. That's why we created a list of products our supporters can purchase without handing a dime to Nestle or Starbucks. Items are ranked by tier: Tier 1 is indigenous/POC owned companies, Tier 2 is certified sustainable businesses, and Tier 3 is family affordable products. 

Protect Water, Take the #NestlePledge

Nestle, the world's largest food and beverage company, hoards water from sensitive ecosystems and makes billions in profit as disaster capitalists. Take our #NestlePledge and join the movement to #BoycottNestle and ALL its products. Signify to Nestle that #WaterIsLife. You can learn more about the history of Nestle’s unethical and predatory business practices here.

Nestle Permitted to Take Water from Michigan and California

Nestle Waters North America is granted the right to pump 400 gallons/minute from the water table in Michigan for a shocking $200 annually. This sparks controversy, as nearby Flint has been without clean water since April, 2014. 


In California, the US Forest Service grants a permit to Nestle to continue pumping water from the drought- and wildfire-ravaged San Bernardino Mountains — despite the fact that Nestle's last permit expired in 1988.  

Dutch Bank Refuses to Invest in Tar Sands Pipelines

In response to a letter sent by a coalition of indigenous activists, grassroots organizations, and environmental groups, the Dutch-based ING Bank announces it will not invest in four recently approved Canadian tar sands pipelines. This comes several months after ING sold it's share of $120 million in debt and became the first bank to officially sever all ties with DAPL. 

Los Angeles Divests $40 Million from Wells Fargo

Divest LA successfully pressures the Los Angeles City Council to divest $40 million in holdings from Wells Fargo.

German Bank Cuts Ties with DAPL and ETP

Activists deliver a petition with 260,000 signatures to Bavarian public bank Bayern LB, coinciding with the visit of US Vice President Mike Pence and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson.

Several days later, Bayern LB announces they will withdraw financing DAPL and will not be renewing their contract with Energy Transfer Partners.

Standing Rock Divests, #DefundDAPL Movement Begins

In October, the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe passes a resolution that ends over two decades of banking with Wells Fargo.

The DefundDAPL.org website goes live. People begin to learn how to move their money, move their cities’ money, obtain bank officials’ contact information, and find a helpful information on alternative banks.

Nestle Under Fire for Water Privatization

Former Nestle CEO Peter Brabeck-Letmathe draws criticism after stating in a documentary that water is not a human right. In his words, "water is a grocery product. And just as every other product, it should have a market value.” 

Nestle Boycott Begins

Anti-Apartheid Movement Boycotts South Africa

Beginning in the 1960s, artists, writers, athletes, and sports fans around the world begin an international cultural boycott of South Africa over its racist apartheid policy, set into law in 1948. This pressure ultimately leads to South Africa being excluded from the Olympic Games.